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Home » Central India Tours » Places of Interest

Central India Tours


Places of Interest

Bandhavgarh
This is a small National Park; compact, yet full of game. The density of the tiger population at Bandhavgarh is the highest known in India. This is also white Tiger country. These have been found in the old state of Rewa for many years. The last known was captured by maharaja Martand Singh in 1951 . This White tiger , Mohun, is now stuffed and on display in the Palace of the Mahrahahs of Rewa.

Bhopal
Bhopal, the capital of Madhya Pradesh, is a fascinating amalgam of scenic beauty, historicity and modern urban planning. It is situated on the site of a 11th century city, Bhojapal, founded by Raja Bhoja. The founder of the existing city was however an Afghan soldier of fortune, Dost Mohammed. Fleeing from Delhi in the chaotic period that followed Aurangazeb's death, Dost Mohammed encountered the beautiful Gond queen Kamalapati, who sort his aid after the murder of her consort.

Chitrakoot
Chitrakoot: This loveliest of nature's gifts is also hallowed ground, blessed by the gods and sanctified by the faith of pilgrims. For Chitrakoot's spiritual legacy stretches back to legendary ages: it was in these deep forests that Rama and Sita spent eleven of their fourteen years of exile; here, that the great sage Atri and Sati Anusuya meditated; and here where the principal trinity of the Hindu pantheon, Brahma, Vishnu and Mahesh, took their incarnations.

Gwalior
Gwalior Kachwahas and Tomars have left indelible etching of their rule in this city of palaces, temples and monuments. The magnificent momentoes of a glorious past have been preserved with care, giving Gwalior a unique and timeless appeal. The ancient capital of Gwalior is steeped in the splendour of its past. A multitude of regning dynasties, of the great Rajput clans of the Pratiharas.

Jabalpur
Jabalpur pleasure resort and capital of the gond kings during the 12th century, jabalpur was later the seat of the kalchuri dynasty. The Marathas held sway over jabalpur until 1817, when the Brritish wrested it from them and left their impression on the spacious cantonment with its colonial residences and barracks. Today jabalpur is an important administrative centre, abustle with commercial activity.

Kanha
The Kanha National Park, in Madhya Pradesh, forms the core of the Kanha Tiger Reserve created in 1974, under Project Tiger. Stretching over 940 sq km, the vegetation, chiefly made of sal and bamboo forests, grasslands and streams, this park is the sole habitat of the rare hardground barasingha.

Khajuraho
The temples of Khajuraho are India's unique gift to the world, representing, as they do, a paean to life, to love, to joy; perfect in execution and sublime in expression. Life, in every form and mood, has been capured in stone, testifying not only to the craftsman's artistry but also to the extraordinary breadth of vision of the Chandela Rajputs under whose rule the temples were conceived and constructed.

Orchha
Orchha was founded in the 16th century by the Bundela Rajput chieftain Rudra Pratap who chose this stretch of land along the Betwa river as an ideal site for his capital. Of the succeeding rulers, the most notable was Raja Bir Singh Ju Deo who built the exquisite Jehangir Mahal, a tiered palace crowned by graceful chhatries. From here the view of soaring temple spires and cenotaphs is spectacular.

Sanchi
Sanchi is known for stupas, monasteries, temples and pillars dating from the 3 rd century BC to the 12th century AD. The most famous of these monuments, the Sanchi Stupa 1, was originally built by the Mauryan Emperor Ashoka, the then governor of Ujjayini, whose wife Devi was the daughter of a merchant from adjacent Vidisha. Their son Mahindra and daughter Sanghamitra were born in Ujjayini and sent to sri Lanka, where they converted the king, the queen and their people to Buddhism.

Shivpuri
Shivpuri, in the state of Madhya Pradesh, was once the summer capital of the Scindia clan of Gwalior. Prior to that, its thick forests were the hunting grounds of Emperor Akbar. They were home to the tiger, and the site of many a grand shikar, resulting in several big cats being 'bagged' by royal huntsmen. The sylvan surroundings and an other - worldly aura that it exuded, made it the natural choice as the summer resort capital of the Scindias. Shivpuri's royal ambience still lives on in its majestic palaces, hunting lodges, exquisitely adorned chhatries (cenotaphs) built by the Scindias.